Unit 2 Assignment 1, Angelo Dean

The early modern view of “the connected world” (ch. 2) is an example of a large-scale conceptual scheme. See if you can describe this worldview in your own words. Are there any parts of it still present in contemporary science? (See p. 38 for some suggestions—try to expand on these or come up with your own examples.)

This worldview is one that is based on observation, where the philosophers of the time noticed that there is a connection between objects. An example that they referred to often was the connection between the sunflower and the sun. The sunflower always faces the sun, as well as blooms in a way that is similar to the sun, therefore, there must be a connection between the sun and the sunflower. There is also the idea that everything has two innate set of qualities: their manifest qualities that everyone with sensory organs can notice, and their hidden qualities, qualities that cannot be detected. An example of such a quality would be the connection between the sunflower and the sun. In contemporary science there is still some belief that there is a connection between objects. An example could be flower pollen in the spring and the sudden increase in romantic attraction that humans exhibit at the same time. Pollen is a plants way of procreation, so the sudden increase in airborne particles influences humans desire to procreate. Hence, pollen being considered an aphrodisiac.

How would Locke define man’s efficient, natural, formal, and final causes in the state of nature?

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