schedule

This a one long cumulative schedule including readings, lectures, and related events. Click on the unit here to zoom straight to that unit. (Search the site; login to post.)

FALL SEMESTER
Sapere aude pre-orientation workshop, one week before regular orientation.
August 15 – August 18, Black Mountain, NC. Go here for details.
Framing Lecture for the course by Prof. Robb during Sapere Aude.

unit 1 (Quillen 8/23-9/13)
unit 2 (Robb 9/18 – 10/4)
unit 3 (Tamura – October 10/11-11/1)
unit 4 (Wills – November 11/6-12/4 )
winter break  (assignment 12/15-1/10)

SPRING SEMESTER

winter study trip, The Legacy Museum and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, Montgomery, Alabama
Thursday January 9 – Saturday January 11 (early arrival Wed Jan 8)
unit 5 (Bory)
unit 6 (Munger)
unit 7 (Ewington)
unit 8 (Denham)
final work (final work)

presentation and evaluation 4/28-5/6


UNIT 1 • Professor Quillen

Equality

This unit explores the simultaneous emergence in fifteenth- to eighteenth-century Europe of aspirationally liberating ideas (natural human freedom and equality, reason, inalienable human rights, a social compact/contract, etc.) and brutal practices that deny putatively human rights to large numbers of humans.

This unit’s artifact:

Photo of part of the watercolor and graphite work on paper by  Barthélémy Toguo, called Purification, from 2012.
Barthélémy Toguo, “Purification.” Watercolor and graphite on paper. Tate, London.

 

 


8/27 Tuesday morning • in Hance • opening lecture (not public; just for Humesters and the teaching team)
Prof. Quillen — opening lecture: themes of the course and this unit
• required plenary response form here
Prof. Denham — five minutes on resources, login instructions, for the course pages, dropbox, drive / docs / sheets, and domains)

mini-post due Wednesday at 8:00pm • assignment here

Thursday morning, August 29 • in Hance • discussion
before class READ or WATCH (take notes in your red notebook)
Chiminanda Ngozi Adichie,
“The Danger of a Single Story” (watch here)
Arthur Brooks, “The Power and Peril of Identity” (text in the Quillen dropbox folder)
Amin Maalouf, “Deadly Identities” (text in the Quillen dropbox folder)
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, “Questions of Multiculturalism”(text in the Quillen dropbox folder)
Toni Morrison, “Moral Inhabitants” (text in the Quillen dropbox folder)
Bryan Stevenson, Excerpt of speech at Children Defense Fund training (watch here)

Topics from the board this morning.

Any questions after the conversation this morning? Put those in the (new! streamlined!) form here! (virtual notecard, yeah)

Thursday afternoon, August 29 • in Hance • public lecture
Prof. Quillen, “humanism’s human and its critics”
• required plenary response form here

WRITE your post on the reading for Tuesday, due by Sunday 5:00pm. Assignment here.

Tuesday, September 3 morning • in sections
READ and WRITE (post by Sunday 5:00pm)
Denis Diderot, on “Natural Law,” in the Encyclopedie 1755-, vol.5, 115-116;  cited here in The French Revolution and Human Rights, ed. Lynn Hunt (Boston, 1996 and 2016), 35-37. (text in the Quillen dropbox folder; go here for a gallery of images of the original text from the Encyclopedie in our library)

John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (text in the Quillen dropbox folder)
We are reading excerpts from The Second Essay, which starts on page 105. Please read these excerpts: Chapter I, paragraphs 1-3; Chapter II, paragraphs 4-7; Chapter III, paragraph 19; Chapter IV (all); Chapter V (all) 24-51; Chapter VI, paragraphs 52-55, 63; Chapter VII, paragraphs 77-82; Chapter VIII, paragraphs 95-99; Chapter IX (all).
Prof. Quillen’s key questions and notes on the Locke readings are in the Quillen dropbox folder. Read these notes at the same time you read Locke.
US Declaration of Independence transcription here; image here.

Tuesday September 3
event to review — lecture
Carol Quillen “Being Human, Disciplinary Reflections” 7pm Tyler-Tallman Hall

Thursday, September 5 morning • in sections
Karl Marx, Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 (text in the Quillen dropbox folder
“Estranged Labor” pp. 28-35
“The Power of Money in a Bourgeois Society” pp. 59-62
Olympe de Gouges, “Declaration of the Rights of Woman” (text in the Quillen dropbox folder; from here)

Thursday, September 5 afternoon • Hance • public lecture
Prof. Quillen, on colonialism
• required plenary response form here

WRITE your draft of part 1 of project 1 due by Sunday 5:00pm
Project 1 assignment [here]
jk, this will be due Friday 9/20

Write your post number 3 before Sunday, Sept 8 at 5pm. Assignment here and above.

lots of reading for Tuesday; please plan ahead

Monday, Sept 9, see the campus event calendar for the Kristol & Allen conversation. You need a (free) ticket. Get those at the Union Box Office between 10 and 4 on Friday.

Tuesday, September 10 morning in sections • discussion
Toni Morrison, “Black Matter(s)” (2019)
Frantz Fanon, Black Skin White Masks (1952)
Introduction and Chapter 1, “The Negro and Language” 1-28
Angela Davis, “Recognizing Racism in an Era of Neoliberalism”
(all three texts in the Quillen dropbox folder)

Thursday, September 12 morning in sections
READ for class
Jo Carillio, “And When You Leave, Take Your Pictures With You”
Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, part 1 “Introduction” pp. 23-39
Friedrich Engels, “The Monogamous Family” pp. 33-44 in Origins of the Family, Private Property and the State
(all these texts in the Quillen dropbox folder)

Thursday, September 12 afternoon • Hance • public lecture
Prof. Quillen, summing up and looking ahead
READ
The UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)
(in the Quillen dropbox folder)
• required plenary response form here


Tuesday, September 17 in sections
domains and portfolio workshop, with T&I tech and design staff and fellows

Thursday, September 19 morning Hance
domains and portfolio theory and practice, with Instructional Designers Sundi Richard and Daniel Lynds

Friday September 20, 5:00pm
Draft of project 1 due in the dropbox.

Friday, September 20, in the Lilly Family Gallery, 6:00pm
Out with the Old and In with the Humes!
Dinner and Humes alum show and tell and celebrate! portfolios.

Humes movie afterward 8pm on (optional).



UNIT 2 • Prof. Robb                                                             
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Conceptual schemes

A conceptual scheme is, roughly, a set of foundational principles and concepts that shape how we experience the world. (To see the role of a conceptual scheme on a small scale, note how your experience of the figure below changes as you categorize it first as a duck and then as a rabbit.) In this unit we’ll look at (1) the role of conceptual schemes (“paradigms”) in science, with a focus on the scientific revolution; (2) the possibility of radically different conceptual schemes, and the criteria we might use to choose among them; and (3) the sense, if any, in which truth and knowledge are constructed by our conceptual schemes.

This unit’s artifact:


Anon. “Which animals most resemble one another? Rabbit and duck.” Fliegende Blätter (23 October 1892): 17.

Thursday, September 19 afternoon, Hance
PUBLIC LECTURE

Prof. Kristen Thompson “From Observation to Theory:  Revolution in Science”
READ: Principe, The Scientific Revolution: A Very Short Introduction, chs. 1-3.
• required plenary response form here

Sunday Sept 22 5:00pm
unit 2, post 1 due

week of 9/23-9/27
paper 1 revisions with fellows and faculty; required one-on-one writing tutor sessions; required meetings with faculty

Tues Sept 24 morning in sections
READ: Principe, The Scientific Revolution: A Very Short Introduction, chs. 4-6 and the Epilogue

Wednesday Sept 25 evening screening 9:00pm – 11:00pm
We’ll screen Arrival in Hance. Movies are more fun together. You can also stream it on your own or in small groups (on-campus link for viewing here). See this film before Thursday afternoon.

Thurs Sept 26 morning in sections
READ: Kuhn, selections from The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (with commentary in Boersema, “Paradigms and Research Programs”); in the Robb dropbox folder.

Thurs Sept 26 afternoon, Hance
PUBLIC LECTURE
Faculty Panel, On Translation. Profs. Marija Jankovic, Amanda Ewington, Scott Denham.
VIEW: Arrival (film, streamed on Swank, link for viewing here)
• required plenary response form here

Friday, September 27, 5:00 pm. Draft 2 of paper 1 due.

Sunday Sept 29 5:00pm
unit 2, post 2 due

week of 9/30-10/4
paper 1 revisions, required meetings with peers and fellows

Tues Oct 1 morning in sections
Borges, “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius” PDF in the dropbox
Plato, The Allegory of the Cave (selection from The Republic); in the Robb dropbox folder.

Thurs Oct 3 morning in sections
Read: James, Pragmatism, Lecture VII (optional pre-read: Lecture VI); in the Robb dropbox folder.
Optional pre-read: Appiah, Thinking It Through, pp. 39-61; EBOOK here.

Thurs Oct 3 afternoon in sections

Frankfurt, “On Bullshit”, ch. 10 of The Importance of What We Care About EBOOK here

Friday Oct 4 5:00pm
Project 1 final version due.

Sunday Oct 6 5:00pm
unit 2, post 3 due

Tues Oct 8 morning in sections
Appiah, selection from Thinking it Through (pp. 339-60) EBOOK here

Thurs Oct 10 morning Hance
Plenary Lecture open to the public
Prof. Dave Robb
Read: Rorty, “Solidarity or Objectivity?”; in the Robb dropbox folder.
• required plenary response form here

Thurs Oct 10 afternoon in Hance – plenary session
open to the public
• Librarians and archivists
Cara Evanson and colleagues
Debbie Lee Landi and colleagues
Ethics, politics, philosophies of organizing, storing, owning, finding, sharing, selling and giving away knowledge in the humanities.
• required plenary response form here 


Fall break assignment here. You need Lapham’s Revolutions and your red notebook over break.
You should also get started on the two books we’ll read this unit: Gourevitch and Sontag.


The fall study trip as been cancelled. Study trips in January and  February are on.


UNIT 3 • Professor Tamura
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This unit’s artifact:

James Nachtwey's photo of piles of machetes abandoned by Hutu genocidaires at the Tanzanian border.
“As the vanquished Hutus fled into Tanzania, they had to leave at the border the weapons with which they had committed the genocide, Rwanda, 1994.” James Nachtwey for TIME http://time.com/3449593/when-the-world-turned-its-back-james-nachtweys-reflections-on-the-rwandan-genocide/

NB: Texts to purchase for this unit are in the college bookstore:
• Philip Gourevitch, We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1998.
• Susan Sontag, Regarding the Pain of Others. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2003.

Wednesday post, due 5:00pm.
This is a little research post, assignment here and under the assignments tab.

Thursday Oct 17 morning in Hance
public lecture
• announcements; checking in on paper 1; reviewing the fall break assignment; in-class responses http://tiny.cc/ldilez

Professor Tamura — introduction to the unit
Before this session (1) read or listen to this brief interview between host Jacki Lyden and biographer Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, “Hannah Arendt and the Study of Evil” (link here and a pdf transcript in the Tamura dropbox folder) and (2) read Randall Ingram, “banality vs. ubiquity”  from the course teaching notes last year (in the Tamura dropbox folder).
• required plenary response form here 

Thursday Oct 17 afternoon in Hance
Librarians
James Sponsel and colleagues
How to find the conversation and know if it has value.
research basics and Zotero with examples for the unit and the paper 2 assignment. Have a very close look at the artifact for this unit and the linked source for this artifact before this session.
• required plenary response form here

Tuesday Oct 22 morning in sections
Philip Gourevitch, We wish to inform you that tomorrow we will be killed with our families, pages 3-62.

Tuesday Oct 22, 11 am – 3pm, drop in — Alvarez Student Union
Attend the Make Your Own Passport Workshop 11-3 in the Union with visiting artist Tintin Wulia. See the prompt due Wednesday at 9pm.

ATs this week: Fellows work with Humesters in AT sessions on their Zotero accounts.

Wednesday Oct 23
brief post, assignment here and under the assignments tab

Thursday Oct 24 morning in sections
read beforehand
Gourevitch, 85-99, 110-131
Valerie Hartouni, “The Banality of Evil,” in Visualizing Atrocity: Arendt, Evil, and the Optics of Thoughtlessness (New York: NYU Press, 2012), 81-88. In the Tamura dropbox folder.

Thursday Oct 24 afternoon in Hance
public plenary session
Prof. Tamura presentation and discussion
Susan Sontag, Regarding the Pain of Others, chapters 1, 6, and 8
• required plenary response form here

Sunday Oct 27 post due 5:00pm
Assignment here and under the assignments tab

Tuesday Oct 29 morning in discussion sections
Philip Gourevitch, We wish to inform you that tomorrow we will be killed with our families, 147-171
and
Sontag chapter 4 and pages 125-26

Thursday Oct 31 morning meet at the galleries in the VAC
Gallery Director Lia Newman and visiting artists: “Violence, Identity, and Art”
• required plenary response form here

Thursday Oct 31 afternoon — Lilly Family Gallery 3:00pm-4:20pm
Professor Steve Kaliski, plenary session and theater workshop (see beforehand Kaliski, The Refugees
draft text in the Tamura dropbox folder; do not copy or distribute ) 
Public event

. Steve Kaliski teaching a theatre workshop in the 2018-19 humanities course.
• required plenary response form here

Friday November 1, 5:00pm paper 2 draft 1 due
(corrected here to fix the date to match the assignment page)

Tuesday Nov 5 morning in Hance
Prof. Tamura, public lecture and discussion
read beforehand
Gourevitch 340-353
Suheir Hammad 2 poems: “exotic” (in the Tamura dropbox folder) and her performance of “first writing since” here.
Sontag chapter 7

Thursday Nov 7 morning in Hance
Visiting artist Nicolaus Renaud
public lecture on indigeneity;  Q&A moderated by Prof. Tamura
Read beforehand: Sarita See “An Open Wound: Angel Shaw and Manuel Ocampo” in The Decolonized Eye: Filipino American Art and Performance. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. pp. 1-9 (in the Tamura dropbox folder).

Thursday Nov 7 afternoon in Hance
Public Lecture
Professor Yurika Tamura, “Suffering, Spectacle, and Ethics of Sensations.”
Vibration of Others: Ethics of Body Matters
Read beforehand: Alphonso Lingis, “The Other Community,” excerpts from “The Intruder,” and excerpts from “Community in Death” in The Community of Those Who Have Nothing In Common, 1-13, 31-37, 155-159 (in the Tamura dropbox folder).
• required plenary response form here

 



Unit 4 • Prof. Anne Blue Wills         back to the top

 
Is revolution fundamentally a project of redefining who is human? How do racial definitions determine who can take revolutionary action, under what circumstances, and using what means? By discussing different kinds of writing – primary and secondary documents including speeches and manifestoes, legal argument, graphic history – we will reflect on Black uses of political violence and non-violence.

artifacts for this unit:

 

All readings for this unit here in the Wills dropbox folder.

Tuesday Nov 12 morning in Hance
Public Lecture
Professor Anne Blue Wills
Daniel Lee
, “A Great Racial Commission: Religion & the Construction of White America” in Race, Nation, and Religion in the Americas
All readings here in the Wills dropbox folder.
• required plenary response form here

Thursday Nov 14 morning in sections
Cheryl Harris
, “Whiteness as Property” (excerpt), in Harvard Law Review 1993

Thursday Nov 14 afternoon in sections
M-R Trouillot, “An Unthinkable History: The Haitian Revolution as a Non-event” in Silencing the Past. ( here in the Wills dropbox folder)
1792, St. Domingue. Lapham’s Quarterly, 53 – 54.
1792 Paris: Lapham’s Quarterly, 110 – 112 
(Lapham also in an e-version here.)

Sunday Nov 17 post due 5:00pm

Tuesday Nov 19 morning in sections
Ida B. Wells, Southern Horrors (1892; excerpts)
Mary Church Terrell, “What It Means to be Colored in the Capital of the United States” (1906)

Thursday Nov 21 morning in Hance
Public Lecture
Prof. Anne Blue Wills
Robert Williams, Negroes with Guns (1962)
• required plenary response form here

Thursday Nov 21 afternoon in sections
Robert Williams, Negroes with Guns (1962)

Nov 23 – 30 holiday break—no class or AT meetings this week, but readings and portfolio work

Sunday Dec 1, 5:00pm post due

Tuesday Dec 3 morning in Hance
Public Lecture
Prof. Anne Blue Wills
Lewis, Aydin, Powell, March 2 and Malcolm X, “The Ballot or the Bullet”
• required plenary response form here 

Wednesday Dec 4 post due 5pm

 

Thursday Dec 5 morning in sections

your post

Lewis, Aydin, Powell, March 2

and

Malcolm X, “The Ballot or the Bullet” (1964)

Thursday Dec 5 afternoon final Unit 4 plenary session in Hance

Tuesday Dec 10 morning — last class session
Prof. Denham — introduction to the winter break trip to Montgomery (15 mins)
Prof. Alison Bory — introduction to the winter break assignments and Unit 5 (30 mins)
• required plenary response form here

draft practice portfolios due — If you want feedback on your portfolio at this point from Prof. Denham, last chance for that is work posted by Dec. 10. Not required.

student feedback instrument — in class (20 mins)

self assessment — in class or later

no ATs this week

Thursday Dec 12 — reading day, no class

Thursday Dec 19
• final version of the December practice portfolio is due at 5:00 pm
• self-assessment due at 5:00 pm

Over break — portfolio response from an outside reader. Required. Details here and under the assignments tab.


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Jan 9 – 11 required study trip to Montgomery, Alabama

Early arrival approved by RLO for Humesters and Fellows for Wednesday Jan 8.

depart 9:00 am Thursday January 9

return Saturday 1/11 evening

itinerary and reader for the trip here

follow-up readings and resources from the study trip here  (your word list, TNC, Mamie Lang Kirkland)


UNIT 5 • Professor Bory

Bill T. Jones, “Last Supper at Uncle Tom’s Cabin/The Promised Land”

How can performance participate in revolution—in action and in thinking? How can performance serve history? Who gets access to the stage? How is their work understood? Examining Performance Studies and Dance Studies scholarship, centered around Bill T. Jones’s epic work, Last Supper at Uncle Tom’s Cabin/The Promised Land, a dance-theatre production that will likely never be produced again, we will consider dance, performance, and seemingly ephemeral gestures as central to our conceptions of history and political activism.

All of Prof. Bory’s unit readings are in her dropbox folder here.

Jan 14 Tuesday morning in Hance

Sandra Richards, “What is to be Remembered? Tourism to Ghana’s Slave-Castle Dungeons” (Theatre Journal 2005)

Reflecting on the study trip;
Performance Studies in conversation with tourism/memorialization

Jan 16 Thursday morning in discussion sections

Read: Joan Scott, “The Evidence of Experience,” Critical Inquiry (1991)

Read, listen, view: background and context on “Strange Fruit” as song and dance.

What gets included in narratives of history? How do we account for experience? For bodies?

Jan 16 Thursday afternoon in Hance, 3:05 – 4:20
Public Lecture
Prof. Alison Bory

Read: Diana Taylor, “Performance and/as History” (TDR) and Intro to The Archive & the Repertoire  

Wrestling with performance; Conceptualizing theater/dance as a meaning-making space
• required plenary response form here

unit 5 post 1 due Monday 8:00 pm: Get back into the swing of things with brief ! & ? about each of the readings, Schneider and Birns; include quotation or page numbers or key words or ideas in your post. Remember to tag your professor under “category.”

Jan 21 Tuesday morning in sections

Rebecca Schneider, “Performing Remains” (Performance Research 2014)
Nicholas Birns, “Ritualizing the Past: Ralph-Lemon’s Counter-Memorials” (PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art 2005)

See also these images Lemon created as part of his research for Come home, Charley Patton, which are discussed by Birn. Ralph Lemon, “Research Events/An Attempt to Capture the Specificity of Different Occasions,” PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art,  27:3 (September 2005): pp. 29-36.

Performance traces/performing traces

Jan 22 Wednesday minipost due 9pm assignment here

Jan 23 Thursday morning in sections

Randy Martin, “Introduction,”  Critical Moves: Dance Studies in Theory and Politics (1998)

Rebekah Kowal, “Introduction,” How to Do Things With Dance: Performing Change in Postwar America (2012)

Jan 23 Thursday afternoon — Hance
Public Lecture
Prof. Alison Bory

Background on Modern Dance/Bill T. Jones

• required plenary response form here

Jan 26 Sunday and Jan 27 Monday
four screenings of Bill T. Jones: Dancing to the Promised Land 
Sunday at 4:00 pm and 8:00 pm in the Semans Lecture Hall in the VAC
Monday at 4:00 and 9:00 pm in the Semans Lecture Hall in the VAC
you must be at one of these screenings

[paper 3 assignment over the next three weeks]

Jan 28 Tuesday morning in sections

Bill T. Jones: Dancing to the Promised Land (DVD/documentary)
Find a review of the performance

Elements of the work; what remains?

Jan 30 Thursday morning in sections

Ariel Nereson, Counterfactual Moving in Bill T. Jones’s Last Supper at Uncle Tom’s Cabin/The Promised Land” (Theatre Survey 2015)

Jan 30 Thursday afternoon in Hance
public lecture
Prof. Alison Bory

Jacqueline Shea Murphy, Unrest & Uncle Tom: Bill T. Jones and Arnie Zane’s Last Supper at Uncle Tom’s Cabin/The Promised Land” (Bodies of the Text: Dance as Theory, Literature as Dance 1995)

• required plenary response form here 

[Reynolds Lecture]

Feb 4 Tuesday morning in sections

Randy Martin, “Overreading the Promised Land” (Critical Moves 1998

Feb 6 Thursday morning in sections
Nadine George-Graves, “Introduction: Working Dance” and “Chapter 2: The Body: Divided and Conquered” in her monograph, Urban Bush Women: Twenty Years of African American Dance Theatre
(This reading also for the afternoon closing plenary session; read well.)

Feb 6 Thursday afternoon in Hance
Public Lecture
Prof. Alison Bory

 

February 8 Saturday — all day — study trip to Greensboro for a museum visit and a dance performance. Attendance required except for college sponsored absences.

1:30pm depart Baker lot on buses
3-5pm The International Civil Rights Center and Museum, in the Woolworth Building. “The International Civil Rights Center & Museum is an archival center, collecting museum and teaching facility devoted to the international struggle for civil and human rights. The Museum celebrates the nonviolent protests of the 1960 Greensboro sit-ins that served as a catalyst in the civil rights movement.

5-7pm Dinner on your own in groups downtown.

7:00pm bus from the museum to UNCG performance venue

7:30 pm at the venue, tickets, get settled, find seats
8:00 pm Camille A. Brown & Dancers performance at UNCG Arts.

about 10:30 buses depart

about midnight back in Davidson


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UNIT 6 • Unit 6: Reductionism in Art and Brain Science, Eric R. Kandel
Professor Greta Munger

All the readings for this unit are in the Munger dropbox readings folder.

Feb 11 Tuesday morning in discussion sections

  • Discussion of Greensboro trip
  • Look at the paintings here (google slides “Just the art”) and chose a painting to learn about. Add your name by your section which painting you want to do for your in-class presentation. Prof. Munger will identify the artist for everyone by Feb 14 (Friday).  Only one student per section per artist. 

Feb 11 Tuesday evening lecture (highly recommended)
Romare Bearden and Being Human
Prof. Shaw Smith, Art History
7 PM, Tyler-Tallman Hall

Feb 13 Thursday morning in Hance
Public Lecture
Prof. Greta Munger

optional readings

  • Sagiv, Noam, and Shlomo Bentin. 2001. “Structural Encoding of Human and Schematic Faces: Holistic and Part-Based Processes.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 13 (7): 937–51. doi:10.1162/089892901753165854.
  • Taylor, Chloe, Alexandra Clifford, and Anna Franklin. 2013. “Color Preferences Are Not Universal.” Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4): 1015–27. doi:10.1037/a0030273.supp (Supplemental).
  • Maier, Martin, and Rasha Abdel Rahman. 2018. “Native Language Promotes Access to Visual Consciousness.” Psychological Science 29 (11): 1757–72. doi:10.1177/0956797618782181.

Feb 13 Thursday afternoon in Hance
Public Lecture
Prof. Greta Munger

See the unit 6 presentation assignment; these begin next Thursday Feb 20.

optional readings

  • Hess, Ursula, Orna Gryc, and Shlomo Hareli. 2013. “How Shapes Influence Social Judgments.” Social Cognition 31 (1): 72–80. doi:10.1521/soco.2013.31.1.72.
  • Newman, George E., and Paul Bloom. 2012. “Art and Authenticity: The Importance of Originals in Judgments of Value.” Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3): 558–69. doi:10.1037/a0026035.

Monday 2/17 Post due 9pm on Snow and more

18 Feb Tuesday morning in discussion sections

readings

  • CP Snow’s “two cultures” (in the dropbox)
  • Kandel parts 1 and 2 (read this; ebook here; also at the bookstore)
  • Siefried, Top 10 Scientific Theories (in the dropbox)
  • Hadhazy, To 10 Scientific Experiments (in the dropbox)
  • iconography, symbols, signs

20 Feb Thursday morning in discussion sections
readings

  • Kandel part 3
  • Alexa Gotthard, “11 Female Abstract Expressionists You Should Know, from Joan Mitchell to Alma Thomas”  (link here and pdf in the dropbox here)
  • Be ready on Greenberg & Lewis’ readings for Lecture

Begin student presentations about assigned artist (from Kandel (book) or Gotthardt (article)); highlight artist’s chosen reduction.

20 Feb Thursday afternoon in Hance
Public Lecture
Prof. Shaw Smith, “Clement Greenberg: Reductionsim and Modern Abstraction

  • Clement Greenberg, “Avant-Garde and Kitsch” (in dropbox)
  • Clement Greenburg, “Modernist Painting” (in dropbox)
  • Sarah Elizabeth Lewis, “Romare Bearden: Assembling America” (in dropbox)

25 Feb Tuesday morning in discussion sections
Student presentations continue

27 Feb Thursday morning in discussion sections
Student presentations continue

27 Feb Thursday afternoon in Hance
Public Lecture
Prof. Greta Munger

 


Feb 28 – Mar 8 spring break


Mar 10 Tuesday morning Hance
writing and portfolio workshops

Mar 12 Thursday morning
writing and portfolio workshops



Unit 7 Professor Ewington

Mar 12 Thursday afternoon — Hance
Public Lecture
History: Stalinism, purges, context, representation

Mar 17 Tuesday morning
Shiela Fitzpatrick’s Everyday Stalinism and excerpts from Svetlana Alexievich’s Second Hand Time

Mar 19 Thursday morning
Akhmatova’s Requiem

Mar 19 Thursday afternoon
Public Lecture
on Chukovskaya and preparing the novella

Mar 24 Tuesday morning
Lidia Chukovskaya’s novella Sophia Petrovna

Mar 26 Thursday morning
Lidia Chukovskaya’s novella Sophia Petrovna

Mar 26 Thursday afternoon
Public Lecture
historical nostalgia: Stalin now, Neo-Confederates, monuments and memorials

Mar 31 Tuesday morning
revolutionary nostalgia politics

Apr 2 Thursday morning
revolutionary nostalgia politics

Apr 2 Thursday afternoon
public lecture
closure
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(Begin Karin Bauer, “In Search of Ulrike Meinhof” (about 100 pages, lots of notes) for next Tuesday.)

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UNIT 8 • Professor Denham
Ulrike Meinhof and the Revolutionary Violence of the RAF

artifact
Gerhard Richter’s paintings of Ulrike Meinhof from his 1988 cycle of 15 paintings titled October 18, 1977. Two of those are our artifacts for this unit: Jugendbildnis [Youth Portrait] and Tote [Dead Person].

Gerhard Richter Youth Portrait of Ulrike Meinhof painting in the MOMA collectionGerhard Richter Ulrike Meinhof Tote painting

Sunday April 5 at 9pm and Monday April 6 at 8pm, VAC Semans Lecture Hall
Screening The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum
(Also available via Davidson Kanopy but a common screening is more fun!)

April 7 Tuesday morning — in sections
Karin Bauer, “In Search of Ulrike Meinhof” and The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum

April 9 Thursday morning — in sections
Meinhof, “Hitler Within You” (1961) and “Human Dignity is Violable” (1962)
and The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum

April 9 Thursday afternoon — Hance 3:05pm
PUBLIC LECTURE
Professor Scott Denham, Talkin Bout a Revolution: The Fascination with Ulrike Meinhof and The Red Army Fraktion.

April 14 Tuesday — break no class

April 16 Thursday morning

April 16 Thursday afternoon — Hance
Public Plenary
a converstion with Samantha Hill

April 16 Thursday evening — 7:30pm Lilly Family Gallery (attendance required)
8th Annual Hansford M. Epes Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities
Dr. Samantha Hill, Acting Director, Hannah Arendt Center and Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Studies at Bard College

Sunday April 19 at 9pm and Monday April 20 at 8pm, VAC Semans Lecture Hall
Screening The Baader-Meinhof Complex
(Also available via Amazon Prime video for 3 bucks.)

April 21 Tuesday morning — in sections
Meinhof, “Counter-Violence” (1968)

April 23 Thursday morning — in sections
Meinhof, “From Protest to Resistance” (1968)
and
Susan Sontag’s contribution to the “Talk of the Town” section in the New Yorker following the 9/11 terrorist attacks “Sontag Tuesday, and After | The New Yorker” (scroll down to p 16).

Thursday April 23 afternoon Hance
Public Lecture

 
April 28 Tuesday morning – Hance
  • group discussion and Q&A about German in Autumn
  • checking in on research papers
  • checking in on portfolios
  • introductions of new fellows for 19-20 and an idea for Humes alumni participation
 

April 30 Thursday morning – in section
portfolio and research paper workshop

April 30 Thursday afternoon — Hance 3:05pm
PUBLIC LECTURE
Professor Scott Denham, Where have we been and where are you going?

May 5 Tuesday morning

final work •

May 6 Wednesday – Verna Miller Case Symposium
Public Presentations
All Humanities students show their portfolios during the morning from 9:00 until 12:30 in the E.H. Little Library, first floor. Be ready and in place with your screen up and any other text or artifact in hand by 8:45.
Faculty evaluate your portfolio work and your presentation and explanation of it at this time.

May 6 evening The Humanities Ball
VAC Atrium 6:30pm
(By invitation only, all Humesters, Fellows, faculty members, librarians and archivists, and study trip team members are invited; others contact Scott if you want to cross the velvet rope.)

May 7 Thursday reading day

May 9 Friday exams begin

May 9-10 Humanities Workshop for teaching team and new 2020-21 fellows. Details to follow.

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